University Driving Simulator Aids in Wyoming I-80 Connected Car Research

The Interstate 80 corridor cutting across Wyoming is a major thoroughfare for tractor-trailers transporting freight across the country. It can also be deadly during the long Wyoming winter, when blowing snow, ice and decreased visibility make travel dangerous. Ongoing research …

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States Directed to Use More Aggressive Measures to Prevent Wildfires

Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke on Tuesday directed all land managers and park superintendents to be more aggressive in cutting down small trees and underbrush to prevent wildfires as the smoke-choked West faces one of the worst fire seasons in a …

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74% off Vansky Bias Lighting for HDTV USB LED Multi Color Strip Accent Lighting – Deal Alert

This bias lighting strip, currently discounted by 74% on Amazon from $49.99 down to just $12.99, reduces eye-strain caused by differences in picture brightness from scene to scene in movies, shows and games, by adding a subtle backlight to your monitor or TV. The LED lights can be changed with up to 20 color selections customizing and setting the mood of your workspace. The strip is easy to install and can be cut to size and plugs directly in the USB port of the TV or monitor. Just Plug-and-play!

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61% off Etekcity Wireless Bluetooth 4.0 Receiver – Deal Alert

Stream audio from your Bluetooth device to any non-Bluetooth enabled receiver, speaker, or car stereo with this adapter from Etekcity, which is currently discounted 61% down to just $19.58. Simply connect the receiver to your speaker system via a traditional RCA or 3.5mm aux audio input, and pair with your Bluetooth device. Its compact design makes it super portable, and its long lasting battery provides up to 10 hours of streaming before needing a re-charge. See this deal on Amazon.

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Federal Probe Finds Tesla’s Autopilot Contributed To Fatal Crash

was killed in May 2016 when his Tesla crashed into a tractor-trailer in Florida while the self-driving software was active. Brown had not tried to control the car in two minutes¸ and the Autopilot didn’t brake to avoid the collision. The wasn’t designed for the road Brown was driving on¸ and drivers are expected to watch the road and take control as needed. is not designed to handle the entire job of driving. The investigation by the National Transportation Safety Board criticized Tesla for allowing Autopilot to be activated on roads it can’t handle¸ and for how it determines whether drivers are engaged.

Read more here:: The Claims Page USA

Munich Re: A Reinsurer With Cushion to Withstand Hurricane Damage

Investors should see ’s profit warning after Hurricanes Harvey and Irma as a buying opportunity.

Read more here:: Wall Street Journal

The Hunt for IoT: The Rise of Thingbots

Across all of our research, every indication is that today’s “thingbots” – botnets built exclusively from Internet of Things devices – will become the infrastructure for a future Darknet.

Read more here:: Dark Reading

IDG Contributor Network: Measuring IT business value: let’s get over the puppy dog syndrome

IT leaders can become obsessively focused on convincing their business partners (and themselves!) that their organizations are generating true business value. This obsession is fueled by the recommendations of consultants and research analysts who encourage IT leaders to develop operational dashboards, balanced scorecards, quarterly service reviews, business cases and project post mortems to quantify the business impact of their teams. All too often, after a considerable investment of time and energy in documenting outcomes, fundamental business perceptions regarding IT value remain unchanged. Why is this? Why are perfectly rational and dedicated IT execs reduced to “puppy dogs” who keep bringing their business “masters” proof of their value without ever receiving a pat on the head in return?

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IDG Contributor Network: Remedy for frustrations in legacy IT infrastructure contracting model

A significant driver motivating companies to migrate workloads out of their legacy environment into the cloud is the increasing frustration of operating under onerous, complicated services contracts. Of course, these workloads migrate to the cloud and a software-defined environment primarily for greater efficiency and agility. But many workloads are too expensive and risky to migrate and thus are better suited for maintaining in a legacy environment. So, I’m calling for a better, more rational legacy infrastructure contracting vehicle. Here’s what it would look like and how companies would benefit.

What’s wrong with the typical contract?

Large, cumbersome, difficult master services agreements (MSAs) with functional areas or towers govern the legacy IT outsourcing market. No matter the function outsourced, these legacy contracts have in common several characteristics that make them too complex and make administering these contracts incredibly complicated and frustrating. These characteristics include:

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Windblown: How hurricane force winds impact HVAC systems

Damage from flying debris and excessive wind is often repairable

Read more here:: Property Casualty 360

IDG Contributor Network: Measuring IT business value: Let’s get over the puppy dog syndrome

IT leaders can become obsessively focused on convincing their business partners (and themselves!) that their organizations are generating true business value. This obsession is fueled by the recommendations of consultants and research analysts who encourage IT leaders to develop operational dashboards, balanced scorecards, quarterly service reviews, business cases and project postmortems to quantify the business impact of their teams. All too often, after a considerable investment of time and energy in documenting outcomes, fundamental business perceptions regarding IT value remain unchanged. Why is this? Why are perfectly rational and dedicated IT execs reduced to “puppy dogs” who keep bringing their business “masters” proof of their value without ever receiving a pat on the head in return?

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IDG Contributor Network: The evolving role of the Chief Digital Officer

With many organizations now three to five years into their digital transformation strategies, the role of the Chief Digital Officer (CDO) has been rapidly evolving and maturing alongside. What started as a role close to that of the Chief Marketing Officer, with a focus on the digital customer experience, has now evolved into something far-more expansive – reaching into corporate strategy, innovation, technology and operations.

In this article, we’ll look at how the CDO role started, some of the latest developments in its continued evolution, the different types of capabilities that are needed to achieve transformational results, and some recommendations for organizations wishing to lead, rather than follow, in terms of digital disruption within their industries.

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IDG Contributor Network: Why Google, Walmart, Amazon and Whole Foods are pioneers in voice data

Each day it becomes more apparent to me that data is integral to every facet of our lives.

When Google and Walmart got together recently to allow consumers to purchase goods from the retail giant through their Google Home devices – Google’s answer to rival Amazon’s Echo technology – the potential for a fascinating new data set reflecting our everyday lives became even more clear. I’m talking about voice data, sourced from what one day could be a technology that’s as pervasive as our mobile phones and our televisions.

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IDG Contributor Network: 5 mistakes companies make when analyzing customer data – and how to avoid them

Whether in life or in business, sometimes we still get it all wrong even when trying our hardest. Recently I ran into a pioneering tech company that was getting AI wrong in a way that was both comical and a little alarming. To demonstrate their grasp of AI technology, they had a robot working the entrance to an event. The robot’s job was to make sure guests registered before entering. What did the robot do if you hadn’t registered? It blocked your path like an NBA power forward trying to keep LeBron James from driving to the hoop. It was irritating, a bit aggressive, and made me—a speaker who did not have to register—late. It’s hard to appreciate a next-gen AI wonder when it’s keeping you from doing your job.

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Toshiba Is Running Out of Options for Its Chip Business

Toshiba’s sale of its memory-chip business is turning into a saga, and it doesn’t have time for that: A deal with may be the best choice left.

Read more here:: Wall Street Journal

Lloyd’s on the top risks in shipping

insurers face a host of new and difficult challenges

Read more here:: Insurance Business Online

Best’s Special Report: Top 25 U.S. surplus lines groups for 2016

In the U.S., there will always be a market for specialized . Where there’s a market, there’s an industry report waiting to be analyzed.

Read more here:: Property Casualty 360

When to kill (and when to recover) a failed project

The project is behind schedule. The pilot has failed to meet expectations. Several key team members have already said good-bye. An important vendor has just discontinued an essential component.

The decisive moment has arrived. Is it time to kill the project or press forward in a new direction?

That’s a simple question. An equally simple answer, however, can be elusive. As economist Paul Samuelson once remarked, “Good questions outrank easy answers.”

[ Find out why IT projects still fail and beware the most common project management mistakes to avoid. | Get the latest insights by signing up for our CIO newsletter. ]

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Hurricanes Highlight Need for Contingent Business Interruption Insurance

As shown by the recent catastrophic impacts of Hurricane Harvey and Hurricane Irma, ensuring that your business is adequately covered for all potential storm risks is critical. But even if your business is not in the direct path of a hurricane, you still could suffer significant financial loss if another business you rely on is shut down or impacted by the storm. For this reason, contingent business interruption (CBI) is (or should be) an important part of your coverage portfolio.

What is CBI?

CBI typically provides coverage for loss of income due to physical loss or damage to property of a third party, such as a supplier, customer, transporter or other businesses that you rely on to operate your business. For example, if your sole supplier of materials is shut down because of a hurricane and subsequent cleanup, your business could suffer significant financial loss. CBI insurance provides coverage for this type of loss.

Unlike traditional business interruption insurance, which covers loss of your business income resulting from a physical loss or damage to your insured property, such “first-party” physical loss or damage is not needed to trigger CBI coverage. Rather, CBI is triggered when physical loss or damage occurs to property on which your business depends for its normal operation. This is why CBI coverage often is referred to as “dependent property” coverage. The term is born straight out of the standard policy language, which provides that the insurer will pay for loss the policyholder “sustains due to the necessary ‘suspension of [its] operations’ during the ‘period of restoration.’ The suspension must be caused by direct physical loss of or damage to ‘dependent property.’”

What is Required to Trigger CBI?

As the policy language provides, the threshold inquiry is whether the third-party business’s property is a “dependent property” under the policy. Some policies include a designated schedule of dependent properties while others define dependent property to include entities that deliver materials or services to the policyholder, customers that accept the policyholder’s products or services, manufacturers of products and “leader locations” that attract customers to your business.

Additionally, some policies explicitly limit coverage to those businesses that are in a direct contractual relationship with the policyholder, whereas others employ broad language that triggers coverage after damage to “any supplier of goods or services.” This broader language should not require a direct contractual relationship between the insured and the dependent property. Thus, if the policyholder relies on a supplier, and that supplier relies on another supplier that actually suffers the direct property damage, CBI still may be available for the policyholder’s resulting financial loss.

But even under this broader language, the dependent property must function in a manner central to the policyholder’s business. For instance, if a hurricane results in damage to power transmission lines that, in turn, causes a power outage that disrupts a dependent property’s ability to produce goods for the policyholder, CBI would likely not be triggered because the party that suffered the physical loss (the power company) has no direct connection or relationship to the policyholder’s business. This is distinguishable, however, from a situation where physical damage to a supplier’s property directly results in a disruption of the policyholder’s business.

Is Physical Injury to Dependent Property Required?

As discussed above, most first-party property policy CBI provisions require that the dependent property suffer some direct physical loss. Whether particular damage constitutes direct physical loss to dependent property sufficient to trigger CBI coverage will vary based on the circumstances, including in particular, the language of the insurance policy at issue. For instance, if a hurricane were to flood and disable a dependent property’s computer systems, the flooded computers would likely constitute the requisite physical injury to tangible property needed to trigger CBI coverage. Of course, whether such flood damage could in fact trigger CBI would also depend on whether the policyholder’s own policy included coverage for flood, since most policies require that the loss giving rise to the interruption be one that would otherwise be covered under the policyholder’s own policy.

When Does CBI Begin, and When Does It End?

CBI is typically governed by time limitations, both for coverage inception and duration.

On the front end, CBI often does not incept until after a specified waiting period has elapsed. Such waiting periods often are between 48 and 72 hours. Think of this as a “time-element” deductible or retention. Once coverage has incepted, CBI will typically last until the dependent property is rebuilt, replaced or restored. This period is often referred to as the “period of restoration.” Keep in mind, also, that like other coverages, CBI may be subject to a policy limit or sublimit.

Unlike an ordinary business interruption claim, however, CBI coverage typically does not require that the dependent property suffer a total cessation of operations. A slowdown will generally be enough to trigger this coverage. Thus, if an insured manufacturer sells a product to retailers nationwide, and a hurricane results in reduced sales to the manufacturer’s buyers in the region affected by the hurricane, these reduced profits should be covered. This is especially important where businesses will likely have reduced hours leading up to and after the hurricane, such as when curfews are in effect after the storm hits.

Read more here:: Risk Management Magazine

Conflicting policy provisions lead to coverage for fire at insured’s home

A trial court in has ruled that because a homeowner’s policy contained conflicting provisions, Allstate had to cover the damages suffered when the home was destroyed by fire.

Read more here:: Property Casualty 360